January in the Kitchen – Spagetti Squash with Mushrooms and Pesto Sauce

January in the Kitchen – Spagetti Squash with Mushrooms and Pesto Sauce

Spaghetti Squash

Spagetti squash with mushrooms and pesto

Spagetti squash with mushrooms and pesto

At the time the British food writer Jane Grigson’s Vegetable Book was published (1978), Spaghetti Squash was considered a newcomer on the vegetable scene. She found it an embarrassing name and preferred noodle squash or squash novella. It now seems to be taking the U.S. by storm, particularly in Paleo or low carbohydrate circles. It’s called spaghetti squash because the flesh, when cooked, can be scraped out of the skin and resembles strands of spaghetti.

I think the name is somewhat unfortunate as well; it is a type of delicious winter squash and deserves to be treated with more respect. The name suggests that you can substitute it for pasta and the www abounds with lovely pictures of using it in lasagna or with a red sauce. I’ve tried it and don’t think the flavor mixes well with tomato sauce, just my opinion. It looks good with the runny cheese (as you can see below) but that’s where it ends. We didn’t like it that much. Any kind of cream sauce, or sautéed mushrooms or chicken is a different story.

Baked Spagetti Squash with Mozzarella and Tomato Sauce

Baked Spagetti Squash with Mozzarella and Tomato Sauce

Ms. Grigson suggests poking a hole in the stem end and boiling. I prefer to cut it in half, remove the seeds, and bake it (flesh side down) at 400 degrees F for 30-40 minutes. The time will depend on the size. The squash should retain some crunch but be easy to separate from the shell with a fork. If you intend to stir fry it, let it drain on paper towels in a colander for a few minutes. Otherwise it can be watery.

This is what I consider a ‘non-recipe’, just a loose set of directions rather than a strict ‘how-to’.

Spagetti squash with mushrooms and pesto

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 pound of mixed mushrooms, wiped with a paper towel and sliced
  • 3 tablespoons of butter
  • 2 shallots, diced finely
  • 1/4 cup of pinenuts, briefly browned in a dry skillet
  • 4 tablespoons of pesto sauce
  • Optional, a couple of tablespoons of heavy cream
  • Few cubes of fresh mozzarella
  • Freshly grated Parmesan
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  1. Prepare the squash as above, baking at 400 degrees, cut side down.
  2. When slightly cooled, shred the strands with a fork into a collander lined with a dish towel or paper towels. Leave to drain while you prepare the mushrooms.
  3. Melt the butter in a skillet over medium high heat.
  4. Add the mushrooms and saute the liquid is gone and they begin to brown.
  5. Add the shallots and continue to saute for another 5 minutes until softened.
  6. Add the cream, pesto and squash to the skillet. Turn off the heat, add the mozzarella, and warm all briefly before turning out onto warmed plates.
  7. Top the the pinenuts and additional grated parmesan.
Squash with mushrooms

Spagetti Squash with Pinenuts and Pesto and Mushrooms

I’m going to take this to share with Angie and the gang at Fiesta Friday, sponsored by the Novice Gardener. Please come join the party and sample the delicious food.

Fiesta Friday

Fiesta Friday

November in the kitchen – Polenta with Mushrooms and Easy Roast Chicken Breasts

November in the kitchen – Polenta with Mushrooms and Easy Roast Chicken Breasts

We are up on the North Coast for a few days and it feels like fall. The rain and cooler weather has given rise to lots of mushrooms. I wish I knew more about identifying them. I’m afraid I would poison us all if I were to pick and cook any! Last year, because of the terrible drought we’ve been having in California, there were hardly any. I wouldn’t eat this one but it sure is beautiful.

Northcoast mushroom

North coast mushroom probably a toadstool

What I will eat is these lovely porcini and chanterelles found in a local store. Now, what to do with them? There is some polenta in the pantry, and some dried porcini mushrooms, also a jar of Michael Chiarello’s Fennel Spice Rub that I made last year. The market had some lovely boneless chicken breast with the skin still on (I think cooking them with the skin results in far more flavor, don’t you?). The menu was made!

Mushrooms - porcini and chanterelles

Porcini and Chanterelles

When I first read the recipe for “Fennel Spice Rub” in Michael Chiarello’s cookbook “Casual Cooking”, I knew I would love it. It has that wonderful combination of fennel, pepper, and cardamom. I added my favorite to the mix, cumin. I have used it with multiple recipes…chicken, turkey, and roast veggies. It has always resulted in a standout dish. It’s also easy to make and is a wonderful holiday gift. I have friends who specifically request it each year.

You will find the recipe for the rub at the end of this post.

Sunset at Seaside Beach

Sunset at Seaside Beach

After a lovely romp on the beach with the dogs, it was time to start preparing the meal.

Porcini Polenta with Sautéed Mushrooms (serves 4)

  • 1 cup of polenta
  • 1 tablespoons of dried porcini mushrooms
  • 1 ½ teaspoons of salt
  • 4 tablespoons of butter, divided
  • ½ cup of finely grated parmesan
  • 3 cups of roughly sliced fresh mushrooms (I used one large porcini and a dozen chanterelles 
  1. Mix the polenta with the dried mushrooms.
  2. Bring 4 cups of water and the salt to a boil in a heavy saucepan. While whisking, slowly add the polenta mix to the water. Bring back to the boil, put the lid on slightly ajar, and turn the heat down to simmer.
  3. As the polenta starts to thicken, thoroughly stir the sides and bottom of the pan every 5 minutes. Cook for 35-40 minutes total.
  4. When done, stir in 2 tablespoons of butter and the Parmesan cheese. Add more salt and freshly ground pepper to taste.
Polenta

Polenta

Mushrooms browned in butter

  1. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a skillet on medium-high heat.
  2. Add the sliced mushrooms, sprinkle with salt and sauté until browned and cooked through. Don’t crowd the pan, as they will start to steam. You may need to do this in two batches.

While the polenta was cooking, I started the chicken.

Chicken breasts with Fennel Spice Rub

  • 4 chicken breasts, skin on
  • 4 tablespoons fennel spice rub (recipe below)
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  1. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F
  2. If your skillet isn’t oven proof or won’t hold the 4 breasts without crowding, place a baking sheet or pan in the oven to heat.
  3. Rub each chicken breast with 1 tablespoon of fennel spice rub.
  4. Heat the olive oil on medium-high heat in a large skillet until you see it shimmer
  5. Add the chicken breasts, skin side down. You may need to do this in two batches, don’t crowd the pan.
  6. Brown the skin side, then turn the chicken and brown the other side. Brown any additional breasts if you need to do this in batches. Remove the first breasts to a plate.
  7. When all are browned, put them in the oven to bake for 20 minutes. Check for doneness. Let sit for 5 minutes before slicing and serving.
chicken breasts

Chicken breasts with fennel spice rub

Browned chicken breasts

Browned chicken breasts

All that was needed was a salad of arugula, simply dressed with lemon and olive oil.

Polenta with mushrooms and roast chicken breasts

Polenta with mushrooms and roast chicken breasts

What’s missing? Oh, yes, the wine! We have a new favorite, this Australian Shiraz.

IMG_0247

Fennel Spice Rub

  • 1 cup fennel seeds
  • 3 tablespoons cumin seeds (my addition)
  • 3 tablespoons coriander seeds
  • 2 tablespoons white peppercorns
  • 3 tablespoons kosher salt

 Directions:

  1. Put the fennel seeds coriander seeds, cumin seeds, and peppercorns in a heavy pan over medium heat. Watch carefully, tossing frequently so the seeds toast evenly.
  2. When light brown and fragrant, pour the seeds onto a plate to cool. They must be cool before grinding, or they will gum up the blades of your blender
  3. Pour the seeds into a blender and add the salt. Blend to a fine powder, shaking the blender container occasionally to redistribute the seeds.
  4. Store in a tightly sealed glass jar in a cool, dry place, or freeze.

Cheers!

This turned out so well that I will be taking it to the party on Friday to be with Angie and her friends at The Novice Gardener for Fiesta Friday #42. Come visit and sample all the great food.

fiesta-friday-badge-button-i-party

Also posted at Full Plate Thursdays and Showcase Your Talent Thursday.